Book review: Lucy Williams

Lucy Williams takes mid-twentieth-century Modernist architecture as her inspiration to create softly shaded, intricate collages. Working with mixed media, the artist turns these often cold and brutal constructions into warm, human spaces. Even though they remain unoccupied, we can almost feel the presence of people in these diverse settings that include housing projects, government buildings, department stores and swimming pools. ‘I am interested... Read More

Objects of desire: Pavilion Art & Design

It is Frieze Week, as it is come to be known, and London is at the centre if an art-frenzy. There is so much going on that the sheer volume is exhausting, and it is impossible to keep up. It is also becoming increasingly tough to shine in such an art-packed annual schedule. The art world – its collectors, aficionados, hangers on here for the parties alone – have descended on the capital city, and artists and galleries want to be seen,... Read More

Exhibition review: Jim Dine

What would you think of a show where every print was covered with hammers and saws and an almost endless variety of spanners, scissors, tongs, pliers, and pincers? Jim Dine’s A History of Communism at London’s Alan Cristea Gallery offers a complex array of impressions. I came away impressed with the ingenuity, intrigued and a little moved too, but also somewhat uneasy. Let me explain. Dine has used a series of lithographic stones left over... Read More

Pavilion Art and Design London 2013 in picture

Pavilion Art and Design doesn’t discriminate among genres. This is the premise for the annual event – that sophisticated taste will like to see contemporary art and photography displayed alongside modern design, decorative arts as well as tribal art and sculpture. The result is an exhibition hall that is a pleasure to navigate for the observer and collector. #gallery-4 { margin: auto; } #gallery-4 .gallery-item { float:... Read More